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6 Organizational Habits That Also Benefit Writers

Writing means freedom to many people, especially individuals transitioning from the corporate environment to freelance writing.

It’s freedom from all the corporate policies that come with an organization—don’t forget customer complaints and pressure from top executives.

That is what I thought after I was given the ax by my former employer and jumped into freelance writing full-time. Instead of feeling anger and disillusionment, I felt a sigh of relief.

Finally, I would be away from all the corporate impositions that governed my day-to-day activities, such as hard-to-hit targets, several admin tools to use, and even training days that required me to be away from home.

So the first thing I did when I got laid off was to exit chat rooms and work-related messaging apps and flew into freelance writing.

But as I got deeper into writing and freelancing, I came to realize that the organizational practices that I despised and trampled weren’t all that bad. In fact, they help maintain sanity in the workplace and in an individual.

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How Writing Practice Can Improve Mental Health

There are a lot of benefits associated with writing, such as improving productivity, communication, and so on. However, research carried out by Dr. James W. Pennebaker, an American social psychologist, found that students who wrote about traumatic events in their life used pain relievers less often and visited the health center in the campus less often.

Writing in detail about your emotions has proven to be a great way to relieve stress, manage anxiety, and cope with certain mental health issues. Expressive writing is an excellent channel through which the writer can purge out your thoughts, sort out emotions with some clarity, and bring peace to your mind.

Although the benefits of writing are numerous, it requires practice in order for you to express your emotions in writing clearly. You might be confused about what to write, when you should write, how you should write, and even where you should write.

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traditional vs self publishing

Traditional vs Self Publishing: Pros and Cons

You finished writing a book. Awesome! You then went through the editing process and now you’re exploring your publishing options. At this point, you may be asking yourself, “Should I choose traditional or self publishing?”

Just to make sure we are all on the same page, let’s quickly define both publishing methods. 

Traditional publishing refers to having your book published through a company (a publishing house) that deals with all aspects of the process, from preparing the book for publication to dealing with marketing and promotion.

On the other hand, self publishing is when you, the author, arrange everything, from formatting to marketing. You might still hire a freelancer—for instance, to design a cover—but you basically control the entire process.

Now, many people might think that the question “traditional or self publishing?” is not a true dilemma, for two reasons: Firstly, these people assume everyone should opt for traditional publishing because it’s just “better,” in some undefined way; secondly, because they assume that since publishing houses are so picky about accepting manuscripts, you’d be mad not to publish your book traditionally, if you have the chance.

However, it’s not quite that simple—few things in life are!

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Why You Should Keep Writing (Even If No One Is Reading)

Finally, you hit “publish.”

The blog post you’ve spent hours polishing, making sure everything is perfect, is complete.

Now you wait. One day. Then two. A week goes by, but only one or two people have seen your post. You poured your heart and soul into that post, but the result is disappointing.

It can be disheartening when no one pays attention to your work. A few views can make you doubt your ability to write.

But you know what? Every great blogger started out like that. 

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