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writing reviews

What I Learned About My Own Writing From Writing Reviews

Review. Criticism. Feedback. Three words that scare many writers. It’s arguably human nature to feel alarmed when someone points out mistakes and shortcomings. Most of us learn to cope with criticism.

But how many authors realize that writing a review can actually help their own writing?

I have worked with countless reviews as a writer-reader—the two are a bit like the concept of space-time; two facets of the same underlying reality. In other words, I have written reviews for others, and I have read reviews written by other authors.

As a result, I have realized that writing reviews can be an enlightening experience.

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writing poetry

What Writers Can Learn From Writing Poetry

Poetry seems to be one of those things that you either love or hate.

Were you the kid making begrudging rhymes in your high school English class, or the one putting their heart and soul into every cheesy metaphor? Either way, you turned out to be a writer, which means you have something to learn from revisiting poetry.

Here at Craft Your Content, Amanda Stein has already explored how reading poetry benefits writers, but what about writing poetry?

Attempted by few since their student days, writing poetry is a creative, fun method of boosting your writing skills in ways that you might not expect. Whether you are used to writing no-nonsense copy, chatty blogs, or high-fantasy novels, consider making poetry part of your writing practice. Let’s take a look at what writing poetry can do for you.

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creative people

The Secrets of Thriving As a Highly Creative Person

Ray Bradbury famously said, “I don’t need an alarm clock. My ideas wake me.” In that sentiment lies much of the reality of life for highly creative writers. It is a condition marked by a drive to constantly assess new ideas, innovate processes, and tackle projects and challenges that ultimately will provide a high level of satisfaction.

If that’s you, it’s a benefit in a lot of ways because it means you’re naturally inclined to approach your life’s work with the innovation and grit needed to succeed. But, it isn’t without its challenges.

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History of the English Language, Part II: A World Language

In part I of this series, we saw how English evolved from a Germanic language influenced by a Celtic language, and later by Norman French, to become a robust language with a vocabulary containing words borrowed from various languages and cultures and with a well-defined yet simple structure.

Starting in the 18th century, the rise and spread of the British Empire coupled with the Industrial Revolution led to acceptance of English as a dominant language in the world of industry and technology.

And with the economic and technological advances introduced by the United States in the 20th century, English is now accepted and used throughout the world in all areas of communication.

Individuals from different countries who wish to communicate will likely do it in English unless they share a common background and language.

Corporations that communicate with companies in other countries need to have a standard means of communication—a language that people will likely understand anywhere in the world. That language is English.

In virtually every area of communication, whether it be personal, business, or government, the interaction takes place using that common factor—World English, also called Global English.

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