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What Moving Into a Tiny House Can Teach You About Writing

A popular trend in recent years is the tiny home movement. Tiny home sales have increased dramatically since the mortgage crisis of 2008, and there are about 10,000 tiny homes in the U.S. In 2017, for instance, tiny home living saw a 67% year-over-year increase.One of the benefits of living in a tiny home is learning how to cope with less and make the most of what you keep.

In February of this year, my wife and I decided to get rid of everything we owned and convert a shuttle bus into a motor home. We were going to live on two axles. Then COVID-19 hit and we had to get creative. 

Pennsylvania went on lockdown, so we couldn’t even look at vehicles until mid-May. When we finally transferred title on our vehicle of choice, we had six weeks to make it liveable and hit the highway. On July 4, we declared our independence.

I’m not trying to convince you to move into a tiny home. As a writer, I try to use every life experience as something I can use to better my writing tool belt, so I’d rather share some things that moving into a tiny home has taught me about being a better writer. Perhaps my experience can help you too.

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The 6 Best Methods for Taking Notes

Even in the era of information technology with the boom of office computing, manually writing down notes still proves its advantages over other digital methods of note-taking. 

Manual notes help writers get a stronger impression of the material, which helps them remember the information longer. They also force the writer to be active in the process of receiving information, making sure they catch every detail so as to not be confused later on. Plus, pen and paper is more convenient to carry around than a laptop or other piece of hardware. Classic ink on paper is hard to beat!

However, with all the advantages that manually writing down notes has, not everyone knows how to apply manual notes most effectively.

There are a lot of note models out there to suit your style and needs. So much so, it can be hard to pick out which one is best. In this article, I provide an overview of the six best note-taking methods, how to apply them, and when. This guide will be useful to you whether you’re a college student looking to improve your study habits or someone in the workforce wanting to improve the way you take notes. 

Let’s get started!

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5 Ways Virtual Interactions Prepare Writers for Future Jobs

Even after engaging in a few video calls or virtual hangouts, I admit I am still nervous to speak in front of a webcam. In most cases, especially before a call, I will Google desperately for ways to engage better, but everything falls flat immediately when the conversation begins. Even my usual mantra doesn’t help!

I believe I have some kind of social anxiety that makes me turn down any conversation or interaction via a webcam. Or maybe it’s imposter syndrome, making me hide behind emails. 

Camera shyness is a typical thing for most people, especially millennials. One survey found that 73% of millennials still prefer to communicate through email and aren’t comfortable with web conferencing. Many, like me, are struggling with social phobia.

That leads to live videos, virtual communication, and virtual hangouts being immensely underutilized by the millennial workforce.

If you provide writing services, chances are you will need to speak to prospective clients, sources, and other writers through platforms such as Skype, Zoom, and Google Meet. 

While each person may have valid reasons to avoid virtual interactions or online interactive events, such connections can offer you additional skill sets that you can draw from in your career and business.

Let’s look at ways virtual interactions and hangouts can help you in your work. From realizing the power of web meetings to fighting writer’s block using virtual technology, modern solutions have a lot to offer to a writer.

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How To Write a Satisfying Conclusion

Writing endings has never been my strong suit. When a friend finished reading my first novel, the first thing she said was, “I hate the ending.” To me, the ending was perfect. It wrapped up the protagonist’s story while setting up the next book. So I asked her why she felt that way. She said, “It’s not satisfying.”

I’d run into the biggest obstacle to writing endings and conclusions. That obstacle is a two-word question: “So what?” That’s what someone says when they feel like everything they just read didn’t have an impact on them.

This problem doesn’t only happen with novels. Whether you’re writing a blog post, a college paper, or any kind of content, you must do battle with “so what?” If you want your reader to feel like your piece was worth the time they spent reading it, you need to learn how to write a satisfying conclusion.

Here’s how it’s done, in three simple steps.

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