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Your Third Writing Prompt

Lesson 41 Chapter 7 Module 4

Week Three. Complete.

You’ve made it by pop psychology measurements.

They say it takes 21 days to form a habit, and if you are opening this lesson today, you’ve done just that. From here out, it’s just about continuing to integrate your new routines, and focus on becoming a master writer.

This week we’ve looked at a number of different structures and formats for writing. There’s the outlining method, writing in bulleted-lists and short sentences, long run-on sentences and medieval prose...those are just a few examples of different ways to communicate your thoughts through words.

The format you use can be another weapon in your writing arsenal.

Remember how the long run-on sentence was meant to relay a sense of breathless conversation and storytelling? Or how the short bulleted-list is meant to read quickly and easily, especially online?

Well, take a look at this mind-bender.

Ever seen or heard of the the film The Shining? Originally written by our course favorite Stephen King, this novel and film are generally considered master studies in absolute terror (not just horror).

But what happens when you take the scenes from the film, apply some new music and structure, and a new narrative? Is this a version of The Shining that you ever could have imagined?

WEEK THREE WRITING PROMPT

Go back and find something you’ve written at least 3-6 months ago. It should be a topic you’re pretty familiar with (the guy who made this video couldn’t have cut it together so brilliantly if he didn’t know every single minute of The Shining before.)

Take the information in the article, and figure out a different way to write it.

  • Maybe you’ll use bullet-points to condense it down to pertinent talking points
  • Maybe you’ll write a poem or short story that shares the same lessons
  • Maybe you can pen a letter to a friend, explaining what you previously wrote about
  • Maybe you can re-outline it to follow a completely different path, that leads to a completely new (or alternate) conclusion

Whatever the new structure, try out something that will put you a little outside your comfort zone, and look for where your mind wanders and how it changes your original perspective.

Who knows, one of the greatest thriller movies of all time might just be the uplifting story that your audience has been waiting for.

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